Iain M Banks – Matter

Image4Matter. What little comment I have seen elsewhere is of the usual variety, “It isn’t as good as ‘The Player of Games'”. I’ll give them this. It isn’t the same as The Player of Games. In my opinion, it is just as good as, if not better than, his early Culture novels.

A non-spoiler plot summary follows:

The early part of the book concerns a race called the Sarl, human in appearance, who are in conflict with their near neighbours on an unusual artificial but ancient planet. The King of the Sarl is assassinated, and his family are in danger from the plotters.

The home world of the Sarl is “looked after” to an extent by more advanced but mostly non-human races. These other races, and the very advanced civilisation called The Culture, involve themselves or are drawn into an increasingly complex crisis which concerns, at one level, the Sarl, but, more importantly, one of the guardian races. The crisis deepens and grows at an alarming rate, and it is not clear how to deal with it.

Surrounding this basic plot is a vast richness of imaginative background. The details of the races, the worlds, the creatures, the technology – especially the technology. Culture fans will recognise some of this, but he doesn’t repeat himself much. Because of the wide variety of personages and places, there is a fat appendix at the back of the book, which I didn’t discover until I’d spent a lot of mental effort trying to remember all that stuff.

I relished the book from end to end. Banks writes awfully well, even when he’s writing a pot-boiler like “The Steep Approach to Garbadale”. With his sf, he’s deeply engrossing for anyone who, like me, enjoys a lot of “cool stuff” in the books he reads. Banks makes an attempt to build up some inter-personal action in the novel, but it’s essentially much bigger than a drama. It’s Galactic politics. When Banks, who destroyed his passport in protest at the Iraq war, writes about politics, I am always looking for the Left Wing moral in the tale. He gets plenty of moral into Matter, but it’s not especially Left Wing in bias.

If I have a criticism, it is that after a steady build-up over the whole book, the end feels a little rushed.

I don’t read Iain Banks for his politics, fascinating though the result often is, I read him for the height, width and depth of his imagination, and that is what you get in Matter.

(but don’t read it if you don’t like sf)

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