Iain M Banks – The Algebraist

Image3When I wrote this, I had not read anyone else’s review of the book, so this is it from the hip:

First of all, it’s not a Culture book. I fancy Banks is finding the environment of the Culture too restrictive for his imagination, though most readers, myself included, find The Culture quite mind-expanding enough.

But here we have the star system Ulubis, with, principally, its Earth-like planet and its gas giant planet, Nasqueron, and the inhabitants of each. The human protagonist sets off on a quest in Nasqueron, interfacing with the ancient race of Dwellers. He is searching for a “book” characterised as “The Algebraist”, in which secrets, important to his culture, are rumoured to be documented. Meanwhile, the Ulubis system is invaded. I shan’t tell you any more about the plot, except to say that, while it starts perfectly coherently, it doesn’t entirely hang together throughout the book, and it’s up to an epilogue to attempt tie it up after a fashion. I cannot entirely blame Banks for this. The plot that is promised initially would take a trilogy of the size of LOTR to resolve fully, and only the chief Quest is covered in any detail. The chief Quest is resolved entirely satisfactorily. It’s the detail of the sub-plots that suffers. And one of the two principal villains is not particularly evil, while the other is over the top.

So much for criticism. I have to heap praise on Banks for his evocation of life on a gas giant, for the playing out of the chief part of the plot, for the description of space battle tactics, for numerous planet models, including especially the water planet.

And I am pleased with him for resurrecting E E Smith’s galaxy-spanning universe with its super-weapons, coruscating explosions and other cool adolescent sf stuff, while dispensing with E E Smith’s steely-jawed American heroes and feisty American heroines from the Lensman series.

The aliens are suitably alien, not just humans in Dr Who suits. The technology is casually believable. The gadgets are great, the space habitations excellent. The narrative is gripping.

Frankly, the book was a whole lot of fun, and a great read for an sf fan like myself. I can see where the literati of the chattering classes are going to tear strips off it, but I don’t care. I recommend it.

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